Monday, November 14, 2005

Tag me with a spoon...

This is one of those strange blogger habits. It seems to be called a meme. Timmy the G (of Voice in the Wilderness fame) got tagged and has sent it on to me and four others. It seems one has to dig up their 23rd-ever blog post, and reprint its fifth sentence.

All fine and well as long as your 23rd-ever post isn't a bloody song, which of course has no periods in it, and hence, no fifth sentence. So the fifth line of the song then? For what it's worth:

Golf Shoes and your

Well that was exciting, wasn't it? Not quite as effective when taken out of context. Considering how dismal that was, I suppose the least I can do now is to pass the torch and tag five other unlucky souls. So here goes:

John of John Murney's Blog
Mark at Section 15
Cathie from Canada
The Gazetteer
Ivan at Creative Writing

I hope you can all come up with something better than my anti-climactic offering. Git to 'er now.

- 30 -

3 comments:

Timmy the G said...

At least yours was something you wrote. Mine was a quote from a news story. Not very original.

Anonymous said...

Timmy the G,
James Bow had this brilliant idea, following your retransmittal of anyone taking his 23rd blog and unearthing the fifth sentence thereof. James Bow says now you take that first sentence and start a short story with it. Waycool.
Anybody else meking progress on this?
(I had to come in anonymous because no one seems to like my password, though my URL is http://www.creativewriting.ca.
Cheers,
Ivan Prokopchuk

Ivan Prokopchuk said...

I continue to be fascinated with
James Bow's idea of writing a short story "with the sentence you unearthed". And yet, as I ponder that first sentence, "To Charleston, to Charleston" I realize I have to do some research on South Carolina songs.
MAYBE SCOTT OR SOMEONE COULD HELP
ME OUT HERE:
There is an ancient slave song titled, I think, "Carolina". I first heard it on Aborigiaal People's TV, edited by (Doug) Proulx. It's not the Wterman's Song, something else. Apparently there was some intermarriage between runaway slaves and the native Indians of N/S Carolina.
That being said, a song came out of this melange of slaves and Amerinds. The song starts with the word Carolina. It is extremely bluesy and makes you want to piss your eyes out the first time you hear it, the slave hardship, the
chains, shackles, back-breaking work and all.
I can't write the fershlugginer story without access to the song and Google isn't helping.
Aidez Moi!
Any clues?
Ivan